Are You Ready Willing and Able to Build a Modular Home

It takes most customers awhile to shop for a new home. When they’re finally ready to build, the last thing they want is to be slowed down by some unanticipated steps. Unfortunately, that’s what usually happens. Most customers are surprised by these delays because they haven’t given enough thought to what they need to do be ready willing and able to build a modular home.

Are You Be Ready Willing and Able to Build a Modular Home on Schedule

Personal Situation

  • Start a new job
  • Get married
  • Welcome a new baby
  • Say goodbye to your oldest child
  • Receive an inheritance
  • Receive an insurance settlement
  • Close on the sale of your house or have no house to sell
A "sold" home sign indicating that the seller is almost ready willing and able to build a modular home
If you own an existing home, you will likely need to sell it before you are ready willing and able to build a modular home

Selections

  • Home style
  • Home specifications
  • Modular dealer
  • Scope of on-site contracting work
  • General contractor

Building Lot

  • Purchase or receive as gift
  • Survey
  • Subdivide

Town Approvals

  • Zoning board
  • Planning board
  • Wetlands
  • Septic design
  • Building Permit

Financing

  • Lender financing or a sufficient source of private funds
  • Acceptable debt
  • Acceptable credit
  • Cash to cover
    • Mortgage down payment
    • Bank and legal fees
    • Carrying costs during construction
    • Dealer deposit requirements
    • GC deposit requirements

Some of the steps might only add a day or two, but others can delay you months from being ready willing and able to build a modular home. The sooner you identify where you stand with each, the sooner you’ll be able to form a realistic schedule and begin working on overcoming any obstacles.

Don’t Wait Until You Are Ready Willing and Able to Build a Modular Home before Signing with the Dealer

One final word. Even if you’re facing delays, I recommend that you sign a contract with the dealer and contractor as soon as you’ve made your selection. Otherwise, you may unwittingly create even more delays. To protect yourself, make sure your contracts include the contingencies mentioned in my 12/7/11 blog, “What You Need from Your Dealer – Part 1, Legalese”.

For a more detailed answer to the question, are you ready willing and able to build a modular home, see Building a Modular Home on Schedule in my book The Modular Home.

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