Construction Schedule Delays

There are many types of construction schedule delays that can cause misunderstandings and ill feelings between a customer and their general contractor (GC). Here are five of them.

Construction Schedule Delays:  Situation 1

The GC does not initiate any work on your home the first seven to ten days after the set. You might conclude that the GC has dropped the ball and the entire project will be delayed. The GC, however, might be completing a few other homes that were started before yours. Completing the other homes first will keep him from having to jump back and forth between several homes at the same time. Once the GC starts work on your home, he will be able to make a concerted effort to complete it on schedule.

Construction Schedule Delays:  Situation 2

The GC gets ahead of schedule on one or two construction tasks. You might conclude that the entire project will be completed ahead of schedule. But there will likely be delays before your home is completed. Although it would be great if the GC completed your home early, it is more realistic for you to expect him to complete it on schedule.

Construction Schedule Delays:  Situation 3

The GC falls behind on one or more construction tasks. You might conclude that the completion date will not be met, but the GC’s targeted completion date allows for some delays.

Construction Schedule Delays:  Situation 4

With three weeks left to the projected completion date, the GC appears to have only two weeks of work remaining. You might think that the entire project will be completed ahead of schedule. There are multiple small details, however, including inspections and punch lists, that must be completed during the last couple of weeks of the project, and the crews needed to complete these tasks may not be scheduled for another week. If the project is not completed early, you may feel the GC mismanaged the end of the project. The reality is he is right on schedule.

Construction Schedule Delays:  Situation 5

With two weeks to go, the GC appears to have three-weeks worth of work remaining to be done. You might feel that it is impossible to complete the work by the targeted completion date. For the past few weeks, however, the GC has focused on completing a few other homes that were started before yours. Once he turns his focus back on your home, he will be able to make an all-out effort to complete it on schedule.

The point of these examples is make you aware that things are not always as they seem when it comes to progress on production schedules.  Whenever you have concerns, the best thing to do is talk directly with your GC while keeping an open mind to his explanation.

For more information about construction schedule delays, see Building a Modular Home on Schedule and The General Contractor’s Responsibilities for Building a Modular Home in my book The Modular Home.

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